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•Do I need partners?
One rule that I’ve used is that if someone is critical to helping me achieve the goals that I have set for the company, offer them some form of equity. If not, make them an employee (possibly a highly paid employee), if justified.

•Goals
Make sure you and your partner have the same goals. It is very important.

•Who’s going to do what?

While the partners will most likely wear multiple hats at the start, there should be a delineation of responsibilities with assigned roles that play to each individual’s strengths.

•How will we resolve conflicts?

Air them out.

I think that having agreements in writing lets everyone involved have a clear understanding of what is being proposed. Put signatures down and be willing to revisit the operating agreement as required.

•How will we dissolve the partnership?

Hope that it never gets to this point, but be prepared just in case.
While no one goes into a partnership with the intent of ending it prematurely, life events or a change in strategy may mean one or more partners want out.

Read more here in detail if you are seriously thinking about going into business. For the industry maybe you just want to contract people to assist with your production or work with a production team. This seems easier to me this way you deal with you and the main few partners you work with. Keep in mind its your business so be cautious and take your time with any deal or contract you commit to.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericbasu/2013/05/14/six-crucial-questions-to-ask-when-picking-a-business-partner/

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